WKDN Drinks: The Honey Bee

Soraya Odishoo, a bartender at Nix, shares a simple weeknight cocktail inspired by chef John Fraser's produce-driven fare. Enjoy!

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"I love this cocktail because, just like chef Fraser's food, it's a celebration of all the different ingredients at the market—specifically, one of my favorites, Thai basil," says Nix bartender Soraya Odishoo.

Most Asian grocery stores and farmers' markets will carry Thai basil during the spring and summer months, explains Odishoo. "It adds such a fresh, spicy bite to cocktails. I couldn't resist adding it to the Honey Bee."

Homemade honey syrup.
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And like the cocktail's name suggests, honey is the star of the show. Odishoo uses it to make a simple syrup to flavor the cocktail. "Creating honey syrup is also incredibly easy—just use a normal simple syrup recipe, and replace the sugar with honey."

Pick a dry sake for this cocktail, like the Junmai variety here.
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Sake on its own, here, would be enough to carry the cocktail, but Odishoo loves pairing it with a small amount of gin. The faint notes of juniper pair very well with the dryness of the sake.

Here's Nix's recipe for The Honey Bee (a.k.a. the perfect way to sweeten your Tuesday).

The Honey Bee

Servings: 1

Ingredients

1½ ounces Junmai dry sake

½ ounce gin (try to pick a gin that isn't too juniper-heavy)

¾ ounce honey syrup

¾ ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice

8–10 Thai basil leaves

How to Make It

The aroma from the Thai basil takes this cocktail to a truly special place.

Add all liquid ingredients to a shaker, then add 6–8 Thai basil leaves and muddle. When you see the drink turn an emerald green color, and begin to smell wafts of basil, that's a good sign it's coming together.

Giving the Thai basil a good muddle is the trick to imparting flavor in the drink.

Add ice to your shaker, shake vigorously, and strain into a glass—Nix uses a coupe for this, but any cocktail glass will do.

Strain, enjoy, and repeat.

For more on Nix, see nixny.com.

From: Seventeen
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