Is "Get Out" the Perfect Horror Movie for 2017?

With his directorial debut, comedian Jordan Peele—of "Key and Peele" fame—proves he's got more than just laughs on the brain

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30-Second Synopsis: Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) and his girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) are heading out on a road trip. They're going to Rose's hometown, where Chris will meet her family for the first time. He asks Rose, who's white, one fateful question before they hit the road: "Do they know I'm black?" She tells him they don't, and while this concerns him, Rose insists it won't be a big deal. But oh, does it ever turn out to be a big deal—a brainwash-torture-murder kind of big deal.

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Watch the trailer for "Get Out" and get a taste of the madness in store.

The Comedian-Turned-Horror-Auteur: This is the directorial debut of Jordan Peele, one half of comedy duo Key and Peele, and from the moment the film begins, it's clear that while he may be a rookie director, he certainly has an old moviemaking soul. Get Out is a film that is both precise and energetic, organized and dynamic, terrifying but, at times, ecstatic.

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The Movies That Made Him Want to "Get Out": Judging by a series of social thrillers Peele curated for Brooklyn's BAM cinemas (ongoing through March 1), he was influenced by classics like The Shining, Rosemary's Baby, and Silence of the Lambs. These all make sense as references, since the movie is meticulously arranged, beautifully shot, and straight-up horrifying.

Will You Groan, Laugh, and Cover Your Eyes? Yes. Yes, you will. All three of these activities will absolutely occur.

The Unlikely Hero: As Chris's best friend Rod, Lil Rel Howery brings a welcome dose of comic relief to his role as a TSA agent with a penchant for conspiracy theories. Rod dog-sits for Chris while he's away, and every time Chris calls to check in, Rod has a new, wild theory to share about the secret evils that must be going on at her family's compound. But as the movie develops, he gradually begins to sounds less like a paranoiac and more like the voice of reason.

Why This Is a Uniquely 2017 Film: If you, like many, thought 2016 may possibly have been the worst year on record—until 2017 arrived—then this is the movie for you. On the heels of Trump's election, Get Out is the cinematic equivalent of a spiked bat to the brain of anyone who erroneously thought America had become a "post-racial" society.

Contender for the Whitest Moment Ever Captured on Film: That would be Allison Williams, in all-white PJs, sipping on a tall glass of milk while surfing Microsoft's search engine, Bing.

Bradley Whitford and Catherine Keener play the parents of Rose (Allison Williams). They seem, um, kind of nice at first?

The Most Exciting Thing About It: The emergence of Jordan Peele as a new directorial voice to watch out for. He set out to make something that sounds impossible on paper: a thriller that doubles as a satire about the state of race relations in America today, and yet still functions as a pure horror movie and also has more than its fair share of laughs. And somehow he made it all work. It's an absurdist film, but one that is also (sadly) interwoven with a whole lot of realness. And that's what makes it the perfect movie for the modern era.

Get Out is in theaters nationwide today. For more information, see getoutfilm.com.

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